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Experience hidden Lebanon like a local: A review about Bouyouti

Updated: Oct 18, 2019

Please close your eyes and imagine a scene high up in the mountains with plenty of sunshine while you are cooled by a slight aromatic lavender breeze that calms your senses. Now open your eyes - Welcome to Bouyouti.


Welcome to Bouyouti! (Photo by Digital Nomad Foodie)

A perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of Beirut


Did you you know that Lebanon is actually a very mountainous country? Not me. Not until I visited Lebanon during the beginning of summer in 2018.


Most people who come to enjoy the rich Lebanese culture usually spend a lot of time wandering the various alleyways in Beirut or the ancient souk in Byblos. That's not a bad plan by any means, but if you want to escape from the concrete jungle and crowded markets you should take trip up the Chouf Mountains.


Your destination? Bouyouti, which translates to "my houses".


The owners, according to the Bouyouti website, are the Bazerji family (Rafic, Roula, Rawan, Rami and Rawi) who were "born and raised in Lebanon...have their place of residence in the same domain, ensuring each of their guests a constant personal attention to their needs."


A quiet, adults-only venue


Before my travel to Lebanon, Bouyouti, was not on my radar.


Luckily our friends, Nabil and Jessica (who were recently married on the last day of June, congratulations again you two!) discovered this place. They moved from Dallas, Texas to Lebanon over a year ago.


They jokingly call themselves the "Marco Polo of Lebanon", but thanks to them discovering a place like Bouyouti, which would be a very tough place to find especially for visitors like you and I, we just cruised right in.


If you want a nice, quiet adults-only place to enjoy a summer afternoon this is the destination for you.


Here you'll you be high up in the mountains surrounded by olive trees, grapes and plenty of purple lavender flowers.


If you wanted to do more than just a day trip and enjoy a bed and breakfast you can also rent one of their guest houses.



The layout


As you make your way up the winding roads to the property, you will see a small dirt parking lot along the road. Parking is free.


After parking, you will trek a few steps passing a stone stairway with arched grape vines. Look for the "Glass House" sign which points up towards the main section of the property.



You'll eventually see some small olive trees on your right, which are surrounded by a built-in wooden table top with matching wooden benches. A very smart design, something I'll mimic back home in the backyard ;)


The green tiles give this swimming pool a nice warm glow. (Photo by Digital Nomad Foodie)

You will also see an inviting swimming pool which glows a warm green color from it's tiles.


This swimming pool along with the rest of the area overlooks a westward view, which is open and clear. You'll enjoy some nice backdrop for plenty of Instagrammable photos.


Good vibes


The music pairs well with the layout. I was able to Shazam some of the music that was playing during my visit to Bouyouti.


Below is the playlist so you can listen to the vibes that were experienced.



Food and drinks


During your trip I highly recommend eating lunch at Bouyouti.


Start off with some local red and white wines from Beqaa Valley, Lebanon. Speaking of wine, that was another big surprise while visiting this wonderful country. They have many wineries, which is a great thing especially if you come from wine country (Napa Valley, California).


If wine isn't your thing, no problem you can also grab an ice cold Beirut beer or your favorite cocktail.



For lunch, the group of friends that I was with enjoyed several courses of fresh goat cheese and beet salads, herbal tomatoes, roasted peppers in a potato salad, sauteed mushrooms, sauteed shrimp, roasted eggplant, steaks, chicken and finally a mouth-watering trifecta dessert of chocolate, toffee and Key Lime pies.


To complete the perfect afternoon, you should order an espresso or Turkish coffee (with or without cardamom) while you nod your head to the music.


If you would like more information about how to get to Bouyouti or need me to put you in touch with my friends who reside in Lebanon, please send me a private message and I would be happy to help you.


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